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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 425-428
Prevalence of intestinal parasitosis among under-five children in a rural community of Purba Bardhaman District, West Bengal


Department of Community Medicine, Burdwan Medical College, Purba Bardhaman, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Soumalya Ray
Department of Community Medicine, Burdwan Medical College, Purba Bardhaman, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijcm.IJCM_461_19

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Context: Intestinal parasitosis (IP), a group of diseases caused by one or more species of protozoa and helminths, is still considered a neglected tropical disease and a public health concern in India. Poor sanitation and unhygienic conditions largely contribute to sustained transmission, primarily among children, adversely affecting health and development. The problem needs area-specific assessment and interventions. Aims: The present study aimed at determining the prevalence of IP and its correlates among under-five children in a rural community of Purba Bardhaman district, West Bengal, India. Settings and Design: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in Bhatar Block of Purba Bardhaman district. Subjects and Methods: Mothers/caregivers of 294 under-five children (selected through multistage sampling) were interviewed for background characteristics at the household level, and stool samples from each child were collected, transported, and examined for ova/parasite/cysts following standard guidelines. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis of the data obtained was done using SPSS (V20). Results: The overall prevalence of IP was 17.0%. Majority of the intestinal parasites were protozoa (42, 84%), of which the most common was Giardia lamblia (24, 48.0%). Age of the child and practice of defecation showed a significant association with IP on logistic regression. Conclusions: Protozoa, mainly G. lamblia, contributes for majority of intestinal parasitic infections among the study population, and children belonging to the age group of 25–60 completed months and with open-field defecation practice have higher risk of acquiring them.


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  2007 - Indian Journal of Community Medicine | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
  Online since 15th September, 2007