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CME Table of Contents   
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 33
 

Evaluation of house-to-house strategy for intensive pulse polio immunization in rural area of Haryana


Department of Community Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh -160012, India

Date of Web Publication8-Aug-2009

Correspondence Address:
A K Aggarwal
Department of Community Medicine, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh -160012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-0218.54932

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How to cite this article:
Grover A, Lakshmi P, Aggarwal A K. Evaluation of house-to-house strategy for intensive pulse polio immunization in rural area of Haryana. Indian J Community Med 2006;31:33

How to cite this URL:
Grover A, Lakshmi P, Aggarwal A K. Evaluation of house-to-house strategy for intensive pulse polio immunization in rural area of Haryana. Indian J Community Med [serial online] 2006 [cited 2021 Apr 20];31:33. Available from: https://www.ijcm.org.in/text.asp?2006/31/1/33/54932


When we are progressing towards polio eradiction and ever­increasing efforts are being done to administer polio drops to every eligible child, it has been observed subjectively that an element of fatigue is creeping in the health system. There is increase in the number of National Immunization Rounds (NIDs) and Sub-National Immunization Rounds (SNIDs) rounds in the country followed by intensive inputs in terms of house­to-house immunization activity [1] . With intense focus on polio programmes, other programmes have come to virtual standstill [2] . Every now and then very often peripheral health worker express that home based administration of polio drops has led to drop in booth based coverage. People do not come to booths on first day, as they know that health workers are gonig to come to their houses on subsequent days. This may lead to dip in the morale of the workers. Since, we are now in the last phase of Polio eradication such perceptions and attitudes could be disastrous, a study was conducted to find out the extent of booth and home based coverage, and to determine the correctness of house markings during IPPI rounds.

Two primary health centers (PHCs) in rural Ambala were selected purposively for the study, as we were monitoring IPPI activities in these areas. Randomly 15 villages were selected from each PHC. In each village five households were chosen randomly from the periphery of the village and five from the center of the village. Thus a total of 300 households were visited on 4th and 5th day of IPPI. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data.

Houses were marked in 88% (265/300) cases. Among the unmarked houses 20(57%) were of general caste, 9(26%) were of backward class and 6(17%) belonged to scheduled caste families. Health workers missed these unmarked houses in 63% cases. Markings got wiped off in 31% and house owner refused for marking in 6%. However, vaccination coverage in unmarked houses was found to be complete.

Among the marked houses 97% were correctly marked among which 3% were 'X' marked. The reasons for 'X' marking were child was out of station and worker was not sure whether child received vaccine or not. Among the 7 incorrectly marked houses two houses were marked 'X' instead of 'P' and 5 houses were marked P instead of 'X'. In those 5 houses one unimmunized child was found and was later immunized by health worker.

House-to-house coverage in the study area has led to an improvement of 6% coverage over and above the booth coverage [Table]. Majority of the population (90%) is still getting the vaccine from booths. Thus health workers should be reassured and their motivation should be reinstated that overall people do come to booths for polio coverage. There can be limited instances of families not coming to booths. However, this is not the popular practice. Their efforts to make the home visits are helpful in raising the polio coverage by another 6% and they deserve appreciation for that. There is scope of minimizing the error rate in marking the houses and not leaving any house unmarked.

 
   References Top

1.National Polio Surveillance project - India and Government of India. Pulse Polio Immunization Programme Operational Guidelines, 2004.  Back to cited text no. 1    
2.Kapil U. Changing Scenario of Child Health due to Pulse Polio Immunisation. Indian Journal of Community Medicine 2005;30:96.  Back to cited text no. 2    



 
 
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