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Year : 1997  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 160-167
Epidemiological Study Of Burn Cases And Their Mortality Experiences Amongst Adults From A Tertiary Level Care Centre



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P Kumar


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Research question: How to use hospital statistics in establishing epidemiology of burns amongst adults? Objectives: To identify epidemiological determinants for Ii) Various burn injuries and ii) their mortality experiences. Study design: Hospital based study carried out for a period of one year (1st January 1991 to 31st December 1991). Settings: Wards of department of Burn & Plastic Surgery, BJ Medical College, Ahmedabad. Participants: 386 adults (20 years and above) admitted at the centre for burn injuries during 1991. Study variables: Epidemiological determinants (age, sex, temporal, place, etc.) for various burn injuries and the determinants of mortality (type of burn, extent of burn, referral time lag etc.) Outcome profile: Common profile of burn victims with relation to the epidemiological factors and other factors responsible for high mortality in burn cases. Statistical analysis: Chi- square and Z tests. Results:Burns occured more in females specially in the age group of 20-24 years. Eighty five percent were flame burns. Flame burns were more in females, while electric burns were more in males. Burns were less during monsoon (27.7%) than winter (32.6%) and summer (39.6%), but electric burns were twice more common during monsoon. Maximum burns (81.9%) were domestic, occurring mainly either in kitchen or living room. They were seen more in late evening. Sixty two percent cases were severe as total burn surface area (TBSA) was >40%. Case fatality correlated positively with TBSA and death was almost universal with TBSA >60%. Early referral reduced fatality significantly in less severe burns (TBSA<40%) but failed to influence it in severe burns. Appraisal of alleged suicide cases (2.6%) and of stove bursting (4.4%) revealed that young females carry additional risk of burn injuries.


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  2007 - Indian Journal of Community Medicine | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
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