Indian Journal of Community Medicine

VIEWPOINT
Year
: 2019  |  Volume : 44  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 4--8

Antimicrobial resistance: Progress in the decade since emergence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase in India


Avika Dixit1, Neeta Kumar2, Sanjiv Kumar3, Vidyasagar Trigun3 
1 Division of Infectious Diseases, Boston Children's Hospital; Department of Biomedical Informatics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
2 Department of Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi, India
3 International Institute of Health Management Research, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Neeta Kumar
Department of Pathology, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi
India

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) has emerged as a major threat to public health estimated to cause 10 million deaths annually by 2050. India carries one of the largest burdens of drug-resistant pathogens worldwide. NDM-1 reported in 2008, rapidly spread to other countries was named after India's capital. India is one of the largest consumers of antibiotics worldwide, and antibiotic sale is increasing rapidly. AMR develops when microbes develop mechanisms to evade the action of antimicrobials. The factors that contribute to AMR include irrational and overuse of antibiotics. In India, various actions have been taken including setting up of a National Task Force on AMR Containment (2010), “Chennai Declaration” by a consortium of the Indian Medical Societies (2012), Setting of Indian Council of Medical Research national surveillance network of laboratories, “Redline” campaign for educating public and National Action Plan on AMR 2017. There is a need integrating AMR education in medical education. India needs to start the subspecialty of infectious diseases and strengthen laboratory services. Every hospital needs to have an AMR policy including infection control, improvement in hygiene, and sanitation and antibiotic use. An element of research needs to be integrated into the AMR policy and encouragement of the pharmaceutical industry to develop “superbug antibiotics.” Unless AMR is addressed effectively the gains made in health are likely to be lost.


How to cite this article:
Dixit A, Kumar N, Kumar S, Trigun V. Antimicrobial resistance: Progress in the decade since emergence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase in India.Indian J Community Med 2019;44:4-8


How to cite this URL:
Dixit A, Kumar N, Kumar S, Trigun V. Antimicrobial resistance: Progress in the decade since emergence of New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase in India. Indian J Community Med [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 May 24 ];44:4-8
Available from: http://www.ijcm.org.in/article.asp?issn=0970-0218;year=2019;volume=44;issue=1;spage=4;epage=8;aulast=Dixit;type=0