Indian Journal of Community Medicine

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 40  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 27--32

Air nicotine levels in public places in Ahmedabad, India: Before and after implementation of the smoking ban


Jingyan Yang1, Bhavesh V Modi2, Stephen A Tamplin3, Mira B Aghi4, Paresh V Dave6, Joanna E Cohen3 
1 Institute for Gobal Tobacco Control, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA, USA
2 Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Gujarat Medical Education and Research Society Medical College, Gandhinagar, Gujarat; Department of Health and Family Welfare, Government of Gujarat, India
3 Institute for Gobal Tobacco Control, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Health, Behavior and Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
4 Independent Consultant, Behavioural Science Health and Development, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Bhavesh V Modi
Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, Gujarat Medical Education and Research Society Medical College, Gandhinagar - 382 012. Gujarat
India

Aim: To compare air nicotine levels in public places in Ahmedabad, India, before (June 2008) and after (January, 2010) the implementation of a comprehensive smoking ban which was introduced in October 2008. Materials and Methods: Air nicotine concentrations were measured by sampling of vapor-phase nicotine using passive monitors. In 2008 (baseline), monitors were placed for 5-7 working days in 5 hospitals, 10 restaurants, 5 schools, 5 government buildings, and 10 entertainment venues, of which 6 were hookah bars. In 2010 (follow-up), monitors were placed in 35 similar venues for the same duration. Results: Comparison of the overall median nicotine concentration at baseline (2008) (0.06 μg/m 3 Interquartile range (IQR): 0.02-0.22) to that of follow-up (2010) (0.03 μg/m 3 IQR: 0.00-0.13), reflects a significant decline (% decline = 39.7, P = 0.012) in exposure to second-hand smoke (SHS). The percent change in exposure varied by venue-type. The most significant decrease occurred in hospitals, from 0.04 μg/m [3] at baseline to concentrations under the limit of detection at follow-up (%decline = 100, P < 0.001). In entertainment venues, government offices, and restaurants, decreases in SHS exposure also appeared evident. However, in hookah bars, air nicotine levels appeared to increase (P = 0.160). Conclusion: Overall, SHS exposure was significantly reduced in public places after the smoke-free legislation came into force. However, nicotine concentrations were still detected in most of the venues indicating imperfect compliance with the comprehensive ban.


How to cite this article:
Yang J, Modi BV, Tamplin SA, Aghi MB, Dave PV, Cohen JE. Air nicotine levels in public places in Ahmedabad, India: Before and after implementation of the smoking ban.Indian J Community Med 2015;40:27-32


How to cite this URL:
Yang J, Modi BV, Tamplin SA, Aghi MB, Dave PV, Cohen JE. Air nicotine levels in public places in Ahmedabad, India: Before and after implementation of the smoking ban. Indian J Community Med [serial online] 2015 [cited 2020 Feb 23 ];40:27-32
Available from: http://www.ijcm.org.in/article.asp?issn=0970-0218;year=2015;volume=40;issue=1;spage=27;epage=32;aulast=Yang;type=0