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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 45  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 291-294
Noncompliance to directly observed treatment short course in Mulshi block, Pune district


1 Department of Community Medicine, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University Medical College, Pune, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, K. D. Medical College, Hospital and Research Centre, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Epidemiologist, Non Communicable Disease Cell, Sadar Hospital, Hazaribagh, Jharkhand, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Amit Kumar
Department of Community Medicine, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed to be University Medical College, Bharati Vidyapeeth Campus, Dhankawadi, Pune, Maharashtra
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijcm.IJCM_137_19

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Context: Directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) was adopted as the strategy for the provision of treatment to increase treatment completion. Poor adherence to medication has been noted and poses a big challenge even after achieving 70% case detection and 85% cure rate. The focus remains on dealing with important reasons of default and timely retrieval of patients who interrupt the treatment. Aims: The aim of the study was to measure the noncompliance of DOTS and to determine the reason for the same among patients in rural area of Pune. Materials and Methods: An observational cross-sectional study was conducted with a study population comprising the patients who were getting treatment in November 2016 and must have completed at least 1 month of treatment in Mulshi block. The study period was from November 2016 to January 2017. All the patients were interviewed using a pretested questionnaire for their compliance. Results: The total number of patients included in the study was 88. The age was 18–70 years in which 77.3% were male and 22.7% were female. We found 71.6% new cases, and 27.3% were the previously treated patients, whereas 1.1% were multidrug-resistant patients. Among these patients, 25% were tobacco chewers and 31.8% were smokers. We found that 61.4% were compliance patients and 38.6% were noncompliance patients. Reasons given by the patients were side effects, stigma of the society, migration from one place to another, and felt better from symptoms after taking medication. Conclusion: Noncompliance in our study is high. We should take steps regarding this so that people adhere to the medication.


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  2007 - Indian Journal of Community Medicine | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
  Online since 15th September, 2007