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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 44  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 209-212
Influence of sociodemographic factors in measles-rubella campaign compared with routine immunization at Mysore City


Department of Community Medicine, Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Mysore, Karnataka, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mudassir Azeez Khan
Department of Community Medicine, Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Irwin Road, Mysore, Karnataka
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijcm.IJCM_236_18

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Background: Vaccines are mostly delivered through routine immunization and catch-up campaigns. Measles-rubella (MR) campaign, one of the largest vaccination campaigns, was launched on February 8, 2017, in five states of India including Karnataka. Objectives: The objective of this study was to compare the association of various sociodemographic factors influencing routine immunization and MR campaign and to identify the reasons for nonvaccination. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was done after the end of MR campaign, by interviewing parents of 147 children aged 9 months to 5 years in urban areas of Mysore. Sociodemographic factors and measles vaccination status by routine immunization and MR campaign were studied. Results: The coverage of measles vaccination by routine immunization and the MR campaign was 93.9% (138/147) and 86.4% (127/147), respectively. While communication with field workers was significantly associated with both routine immunization and the MR campaign, religion and mother's educational status were associated with MR campaign (P < 0.05). The most common reason for not being vaccinated was lack of unawareness about the campaign and the location for vaccination which could have been curbed by health education. Conclusions: The study has shown that there are many factors which can be prevented by the health system that might help in improving immunization coverage.


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