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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 41  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 235-240
Patient safety in obstetrics and gynecology departments of two teaching hospitals in Delhi


1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University College of Medical Sciences, Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vardhman Mahavir Medical College (VMMC), Safdarjung Hospital, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Bindiya Gupta
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University College of Medical Sciences, Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital, Delhi - 110 095
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-0218.183592

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Background: A healthy safety culture is integral to positive health care. A sound safety climate is required in Obstetrics and Gynecology to prevent adverse outcomes. Objective: The objective of this study was to assess and compare patient safety culture in two departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Materials and Methods: Using a closed-ended standard version of Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS), respondents were asked to answer 42 survey items, grouped into 10 dimensions and two outcome variables in two tertiary care teaching hospitals in Delhi. Qualitative data were compared using Fisher's exact test and chi-square test wherever applicable. Mean values were calculated and compared using unpaired t-test. Results: The overall survey response rate was 55%. A positive response rate of 57% was seen in the overall perception of patient safety that ranged from very good to acceptable. Sixty-four percent showed positive teamwork across hospital departments and units, while 36% gave an affirmative opinion with respect to interdepartmental handoffs. However, few adverse events (0-10) were reported in the last 12 months and only 38% of mistakes by doctors were reported. Half of the respondents agreed that their mistakes were held against them. There was no statistical difference in the safety culture between the two hospitals. Conclusions: Although the perception of patient safety and standards of patient safety were high in both the hospitals' departments, there is plenty of scope for improvement with respect to event reporting, positive feedback, and nonpunitive error.


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