HomeAboutusEditorial BoardCurrent issuearchivesSearch articlesInstructions for authorsSubscription detailsAdvertise

  Login  | Users online: 1143

   Ahead of print articles    Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size  


 
 Table of Contents    
LETTER TO EDITOR  
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 38  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 121-122
 

Insulin resistance and cardio metabolic abnormalities among overweight south Indian children: Chennai slim and fit programme


1 Department of Epidemiology, Prof. M. Viswanathan Diabetes Research Centre, and M. V. Hospital for Diabetes, Royapuram, Chennai, India
2 Department of Biochemistry, Prof. M. Viswanathan Diabetes Research Centre, and M. V. Hospital for Diabetes, Royapuram, Chennai, India

Date of Web Publication23-May-2013

Correspondence Address:
Vijay Viswanathan
Department of Epidemiology, Prof. M. Viswanathan Diabetes Research Centre, and M. V. Hospital for Diabetes, Royapuram, Chennai
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0970-0218.112452

Rights and Permissions

 



How to cite this article:
Tharkar S, Devarajan A, Kumpatla S, Muthukumaran P, Viswanathan V. Insulin resistance and cardio metabolic abnormalities among overweight south Indian children: Chennai slim and fit programme. Indian J Community Med 2013;38:121-2

How to cite this URL:
Tharkar S, Devarajan A, Kumpatla S, Muthukumaran P, Viswanathan V. Insulin resistance and cardio metabolic abnormalities among overweight south Indian children: Chennai slim and fit programme. Indian J Community Med [serial online] 2013 [cited 2020 Jan 20];38:121-2. Available from: http://www.ijcm.org.in/text.asp?2013/38/2/121/112452


Sir,

Overweight and obesity during childhood/adolescence is associated with insulin resistance (IR), dyslipidemia, and elevated blood pressure in young adulthood. [1] IR, which is strongly associated with central obesity, appears early in children in the recent years. [1] The aim of this study was to assess IR and cardiometabolic abnormalities among south Indian children with BMI ≥ 85 th percentile.

A total of 2376 school children in the age group of 8-13 years were randomly selected from four schools representing east, west, north, and south zones of Chennai, Tamil Nadu. They were screened for overweight, of which 500 children satisfied the WHO criteria of BMI ≥ 85 th percentile and obesity as ≥ 97 th percentile. [2] A total of 261 children (M:F, 171:90) willing to participate were instructed to stay minimum 8 h fasting and venous blood samples were collected. Plasma glucose and lipid profile were estimated using standard enzymatic procedures. Fasting insulin was estimated by chemiluminescence method, and IR was calculated using Homeostasis Model Assessment method. Lipid abnormalities constitute cholesterol ≥ 169 mg/dl in boys and ≥ 181 mg/dl in girls, triglycerides ≥ 118 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ≤ 38 mg/dl, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) ≥ 108 mg/dl in boys and ≥ 114 mg/dl in girls. [3] Normal cut-off values for fasting insulin and IR as ≤ 15 μU/ml and ≤ 3.2, respectively, were derived from normoglycemic, normal weight children (n = 28) by taking mean + 1SD. Blood pressure was recorded and subjects were categorized as normal, pre-hypertensive and hypertensive as per 4 th report of National High Blood Pressure Education Program. [4] Institutional ethical committee approved the study. Written consent was obtained from the parents of the children.

According to WHO criteria, 322 children (13.5%) were found to be overweight and 178 children (7.5%) obese. Out of 500 children, 261 children with a mean age of 10.5 ± 1.3 years and mean BMI of 22.1 ± 3.2 kg/m 2 showed willingness to participate in the study. 43.7% of the children had at least one lipid abnormality.

High total cholesterol was significantly higher among boys than girls (33.9 vs. 14.3%; P < 0.001). A higher proportion of girls had fasting hyperinsulinemia than boys (45.6 vs. 26.3%; P = 0.001). IR (> 3.2) was higher among girls, but was not statistically significant compared with boys (33.3 vs. 24.6%) (P = 0.087). Abnormal triglycerides, HDL-C, LDL-C, elevated glucose levels, and blood pressure were observed among the children, with no significant difference in gender. This study highlighted a high prevalence of cardiometabolic abnormalities among overweight children, and gender differences were seen in fasting insulin levels with predominance in girls. Similarly, Misra et al., reported high prevalence of IR correlating with overweight and obesity in postpubertal children. [3] A study in North India reported 13.6% of hypertriglyceridemia, 10.6% of hypercholesterolemia, and 18.2% of low HDL-C levels among normoglycemic children aged 14-18 years, [5] whereas the present study on overweight children without diabetes reported higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia and lower prevalence of low HDL-C levels.

In conclusion, there is a generalized dyslipidemia and IR among overweight children, suggestive of probable rise in future cardiovascular-related events. The findings may help to plan primary prevention programs towards weight reduction and optimum maintenance of lipid levels among children.


   Acknowledgments Top


We are indebted to the children who were very cooperative during the study and the principals, parents and teachers for their cooperation. We thank our epidemiology team members-Mr. Irudaya Raj for blood collection, Mr. Mirza Rafiullah Baig for blood collection and analysis of all biochemical parameters, and Ms. Gayathri, Mrs. Shanthakumari, Ms. Ramya, Mrs. Indumathy, Mrs. Hajira Parveen, Mrs. Ruth Annapurni, Ms. Manjula, Mr. Elayaraja and Mr. Pintochan Abraham for their support in field work.

 
   References Top

1.Steinberger J, Daniels SR; American heart Association Atherosclerosis, Hypertension, and Obesity in the Young Committee (Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young); American Heart Association Diabetes Committee (Council on Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Metabolism). Obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular risk in children: An American Heart Association scientific statement from the Atherosclerosis, Hypertension and Obesity in the Young Committee (Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young) and the Diabetes Committee (Council of Nutrition, Physical activity and Metabolism). Circulation 2003;107:1448-53.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.de Onis M, Onyango AW, Borghi E, Siyam A, Nishida C, Siekmann J. Development of a WHO growth reference for school-aged children and adolescents. Bull World Health Organ 2007;85:660-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Misra A, Vikram NK, Arya S, Pandey RM, Dhingra V, Chatterjee A, et al. High prevalence of insulin resistance in postpubertal Asian Indian children is associated with adverse truncal body fat patterning, abdominal adiposity and excess body fat. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 2004;28:1217-26.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.National high blood pressure education program working group on high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The fourth report on the diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Pediatrics 2004;114:555-76.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.Vikram NK, Tandon N, Misra A, Srivastava MC, Pandey RM, Mithal A, et al. Correlates of type 2 diabetes mellitus in children, adolescents and young adults in north India: A multisite collaborative case-control study. Diabet Med 2006;23:293-8.  Back to cited text no. 5
    



This article has been cited by
1 Do parental coronary heart disease risk factors (non-modifiable) effect their young ones?
Arun Kumar
Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Biomedicine. 2015; 5(2): 113
[Pubmed] | [DOI]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
           

    

 
   Search
 
  
    Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
    Article in PDF (336 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


   Acknowledgments
    References

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1155    
    Printed31    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded144    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 1    

Recommend this journal

  Sitemap | What's New | Feedback | Copyright and Disclaimer
  2007 - Indian Journal of Community Medicine | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
  Online since 15th September, 2007